Wednesday, September 4, 2019
8:00 AM
9:00 AM

Registration and Refreshments

9:00 AM
9:10 AM

Chair’s welcome

  • Linord Moudou (LIOR Media Group)
9:10 AM
9:20 AM

Keynote address: how will digitalisation enable and achieve the SDGs: healthcare, gender equality and climate action? Providing a balanced overview of the three areas of impact for the SDGs

Keynote Address
  • Alexis Bonnell (USAID | Office of Engagement and Communication U.S. Global Development Lab)
9:20 AM
10:05 AM

Digital Identity and Inclusion: what opportunities can contribute to achieving SDG 16.9 'identity for all by 2030'?

• Birth certificates and vaccination records – duplicate efforts? • How to implement integrated population registries, CRRF, and the inclusion of refugees  • Financial inclusion or profits on the back of the poorest?  • Implementing data protection, safety and storage  • Innovative ways to create self-managed digital wallets  • Best practices in document verification registers   • What set of enabling technologies can be pivotal in a wide range of digital interactions between individuals and institutions?
Panel Discussion
  • Laura Walker McDonald (DIAL United Nations Foundation)
  • Alexis Bonnell (USAID | Office of Engagement and Communication U.S. Global Development Lab)
  • Jana Mason (UNHCR)
  • Jeff Scott (Smartmatic.com)
10:05 AM
10:20 AM

Humanitarian engagements in Africa and Middle East conflict areas

Communication has become crucial and considered a life necessity. This session will focus on the benefits of VSAT connectivity and its role in supporting the humanitarian SDGs, set by the United Nations General Assembly, illustrated with projects executed with the focus on the SDGs.
  • Najat Abdulrahman (Yahsat)
10:20 AM
10:50 AM

Networking Break

10:50 AM
11:35 AM

Bridging the communications gap: preventative systems and post-disaster

What are some technology lifelines and how are they being used across disaster phases?   The role, use and applications of satellites in disaster  How are technology evolutions enabling, or changing, response?   Are low orbit satellites a game changer?   What do responders need in terms of Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs)  and how are these needs changing?   Lessons learnt deploying ICTs in recent disasters.
Energy and ICT
Panel Discussion
  • Joseph Burton (U.S. Department of State )
  • Adam Szafran (Team Rubicon Global)
  • David Meltzer (Global VSAT)
  • Ray Short (NETHOPE)
11:35 AM
12:00 PM

Case study: high frequency (HF), assure a new approach

This session provides detail on the improvements that can be expected in HF communications by using a network of stations along with modern smartphone applications to dramatically improve first call connections and simplify the use of HF radios.
Energy and ICT
  • John Robins (Codan Radio Communications)
12:00 PM
12:45 PM

Exploring the recent advances in ICT technologies' impact on managing disaster risks and providing more effective disaster response

How do the recent advances in ICT help the disaster value chain to play a proactive role in disaster response? What technological innovations are working well in emergency aid response and why?   Who are the key players in making this work?  What options are available for Inter-Agency Communications and Community Communications?  Managing emergency communications pre- and post-disaster  How artificial intelligence (AI) and virtual reality (VR) can be used as precautionary responses.
Energy and ICT
Panel Discussion
  • Chase Williams (GlobalGiving)
  • Andrew Schroeder (Direct Relief)
  • John Zoltner (Save the Children US)
  • Bob Ottenhoff (Center for Disaster Philanthropy)
12:45 PM
1:45 PM

Networking Lunch Sponsored by YahSat

  • Yahsat
    Yahsat
1:45 PM
2:30 PM

Big data, big impact: understanding the role of big data in health, aid and development

What co-ordination improvements can be made through data analysis and collection? How does data equip you with the tools to predict and plan for aid and development?      How can data offer healthcare analysis by pinpointing disease transmission hotspots?   How can data improve the livelihoods of the poor and marginalised, and promote gender equality?
Energy and ICT
Panel Discussion
  • Adele Waugaman (USAID)
  • Samson Williams (Columbia University, UNH School of Law )
  • Andrea Ulrich (Development Gateway)
  • David Hartshorn (Geeks Without Frontiers)
2:30 PM
2:35 PM

Innovation focus: solar refrigeration technology impacting communities around the world

Global Health and WASH
  • Krista Miller (Sundanzer Refrigeration Inc)
2:35 PM
3:20 PM

Investment in health: innovations in funding Maternal and Child Health

How to help address the risk of HIV infection, sexual and reproductive health outcomes, delayed early marriages, reduction in Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI’s) as well as links to treatment care and support Reducing the mortality rate in children: what measures can we put in place to eradicate child maltreatment, pneumonia, under, and malnutrition, as well as diarrhoeal disease  Detecting best practices in maternal and child health nutrition  Identifying the innovations and latest technologies to support the reduction of mother and child healthcare.
Global Health and WASH
Panel Discussion
  • Andrew Lustig (Global Outreach Doctors)
  • Tausi Suedi (Childbirth Survival International (CSI))
  • Lena Wahlhed (HemoCue)
  • Ethan Wergelis-Isaacson (Dreamit Ventures)
3:20 PM
3:50 PM

Networking Break

3:50 PM
4:00 PM

Overview of PEPFAR's work and private sector engagement

For the first time in modern history, we have the opportunity to control a pandemic without a vaccine or a cure. Controlling the HIV/AIDS pandemic will lay the groundwork for eventually eliminating or eradicating HIV, which will be possible through continued and future scientific breakthroughs in vaccine development and cure research. PEPFAR puts partnerships at the center of its work and shares responsibility with its partners – host countries, multilateral institutions, the private sector, faith groups, and community and civil society organizations – toward the goal of ending AIDS as a public health threat.
Global Health and WASH
  • Neeta Bhandari (U.S. Department of State)
4:00 PM
4:45 PM

Disease watch: what’s next for non-communicable and communicable diseases

Non-communicable diseases are accountable for 71% of all deaths globally. What global strategies should be put in place to combat this deadly pattern? Lessons from Nigeria: getting to grips with Ebola. What are the lessons learnt and how can outbreaks be controlled?   90-90-90: how will this HIV strategy end the AIDS epidemic and make HIV transmission rare?   Communicable diseases, alone or in combination with malnutrition, account for most deaths in complex emergencies. How can high incidence rates of diarrhoea, respiratory infection, malaria, and measles be mitigated?   Women affected by gender-based violence – what are the effects on mental health?
Global Health and WASH
Panel Discussion
  • Goulda Downer (Howard University)
  • Neeta Bhandari (U.S. Department of State)
  • Elizabeth Ashbourne (Partnership for Quality Medical Donations)
  • Mahnaz Harrison (Last Mile4D)
  • Tyler Evans (Global Outreach Doctors)
4:45 PM
4:55 PM

IFRC and Islamic Developoment Bank 'One WASH' fund

Global Health and WASH
  • Richard Blewitt (International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies)
4:55 PM
5:40 PM

‘We are in hot water’: Tacking SDG 6

What methods of sustainable management of water and sanitation will underpin wider efforts to end poverty and advance sustainable development? What are some of the best practices and innovations in WASH?   How can better data and monitoring be used to progress the global monitoring of SDG 6?   How can national-planning processes, policies and strategies set their own targets, taking into account local circumstances? How can these policies eliminate inequalities to ensure no one is left behind?   What role do partnerships play in strengthening regional integration in order to share, access and develop solutions to address poverty and sustainable development?  What smart technologies can improve all aspects of water resources, water sanitation and hygiene management?
Global Health and WASH
Panel Discussion
  • Richard Blewitt (International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies)
  • Daniela Giardina (Oxfam)
  • Morris T. Koffa, PhD (Africa Environmental Watch (AEW))
  • Dinese Hannewald (Grace Impact gGmbH)
  • Sam Stephens (Clean the World Foundation)
5:40 PM
5:45 PM

Chair’s closing remarks

  • Linord Moudou (LIOR Media Group)
Thursday, September 5, 2019
8:00 AM
9:00 AM

Registration and Refreshments

9:00 AM
9:05 AM

Chair’s welcome

  • Linord Moudou (LIOR Media Group)
9:05 AM
9:25 AM

UN global procurement policy perspectives update

This session will help delegates to find upcoming business opportunities as well as encourage participation by registering as a UN supplier on the UN Global Marketplace. It will also inform companies of the upcoming requirements and needs of the Procurement Division.
Keynote Address
  • Kiyohiro Mitsui (United Nations Procurement Division)
9:25 AM
10:10 AM

Innovative cash and voucher assistance for impact on women and children

This session will look at innovative CVA models used by CARE with a focus on positive gender outcomes, and by World Vision, with a focus on children as well as the use of digital registration and payment tools. Each speaker will draw on their experience and deliver examples from their work. Presentations will be followed by a Q&A session. • Well-designed cash and voucher assistance programmes are able to reach vulnerable, disaster-affected populations effectively  • Recent innovations in the field have enabled more precise targeting of vulnerable populations, including women and children, and management of risks involved Anyone trying to assist women and children during an emergency or protracted crisis situation should consider use of cash and voucher mechanisms, as long as markets are functioning.
  • Benjamin Phillips (ChildFund International)
  • Holly Radice (CARE)
  • Belete Temesgen (World Vision)
10:10 AM
10:40 AM

Facebook Libra Coin: disrupting and improving aid globally

With Facebook’s recent announcement of its cryptocurrency Libra Coin and its ambitions to provide access to capital to the global community, what does this mean for philanthropy and development? This session explores what Facebook’s Libra Coin is and how it is poised to positively disrupt development, particularly in hard to reach, low income areas.
  • Samson Williams (Columbia University, UNH School of Law )
10:40 AM
11:10 AM

Networking Break

11:10 AM
11:55 AM

It's all-digital to me: making healthcare more accessible and effective through digital innovations

• Printable solutions: the role of 3D printers in medical supplies   • Primary healthcare system reform and strengthening innovations via loans and grants and investment strategies with ministries and partners • Mobile technology helping people access essential healthcare  • Health systems and primary healthcare in developing countries. How can we incubate innovation?
Panel Discussion
  • Mike OBrien (Relief International)
  • Robert Ryan-Silva (DAI Maker Lab)
  • Eric James (Field Ready)
11:55 AM
12:10 PM

Accessing the global procurement market: the MDBs, United Nations and others

Discussing procurement needs in the developing world and how consultants, contractors and suppliers can be made aware of bidding opportunities from the MDBs, the United Nations and other similar organisations.
  • Brent Anderson (United Nations Development Business (UNDB))
12:10 PM
12:55 PM

United States Virgin Islands update: recovery, resilience, and sustainability

This session will address long-term recovery and sustainability to improve critical infrastructure and public services and make businesses more resilient to future storms and other natural disasters.
  • Charles Sharp (Black Emergency Managers Association International)
12:55 PM
2:05 PM

Networking Lunch Sponsored by YahSat

  • Yahsat
    Yahsat
2:05 PM
4:25 PM

Taking flight: the future of drone development in healthcare and humanitarian relief

This presentation will look at the current applications of drone technology within humanitarian response and consider the opportunities for more co-ordination in the future. Examples will include: drone deliveries of aid packages, medicines, vaccines, blood and other medical supplies as well as providing safe transport in areas with high contagion.
Panel Discussion
  • Liz Bloomfield (Airlink)